Senate Inquiry into preventing domestic violence by challenging gender inequality

media-releases
25 Nov 2015 | Larissa Waters
Women

The Australian Greens have successfully established a Senate Inquiry on preventing domestic violence by challenging societal attitudes of gender inequality and rigid gender stereotypes.

The inquiry will also look at how these stereotypes are communicated to children and young people, including through the marketing of toys and other products, as well as media, entertainment and education.

"As public discussion of domestic violence has increased, so too has public awareness that violence against women and their children is a tragic symptom of gender inequality," Senator Larissa Waters, Australian Greens spokesperson for women, said.

"Gender inequality is at the core of domestic violence as recognised by Our Watch's framework for prevention of violence and a large body of research and strategies developed by the United Nations, the World Health Organisation and the World Bank. 

"By challenging attitudes of gender inequality and rigid gender stereotypes we can prevent domestic violence before it occurs.  

"Gender inequality pervades our daily lives. It sets rigid stereotypes about what men and women can and can't do in the workplace, at home and in the community.

"These stereotypes are communicated to children from an early age, including through the marketing of toys as just "for boys" or just "for girls".

"This isn't about certain toys being off limits. It's about children being free to play with whatever toys interest them, rather than only ones that fit the gender stereotypes marketed to children.

"Gender inequality holds women and men, back from achieving their true aspirations.

"Worst of all, gender inequality creates disrespectful relationships and cultural conditions in which violence festers.

"Through this Senate Inquiry we can gather the extensive and mounting research to make strong recommendations to government on preventing domestic violence by challenging inequality and stereotypes.

"The inquiry also aims to examine the government's other primary prevention activities under the National Plan Against Violence, including whether they could be improved or expanded," Senator Waters said.